Popular Exposure
Nick! 

Is an interesting way you brought out different perspectives of photojournalism. I believe whether is hard news or fine art documentary, what makes a strong establishing photo-essay, is either create a question that draw people’s attention to the issue or simply having a clear message. Furthermore is how the photographer feels comfortable portraying a situation in his/her style and manner. During the weekend, a conversation with an UK base documentary photographer Will Robson Scott, known for his series “Crack & Shine Int’l”. His idea of making a good body of work is to get a day job, while using excessive amount of your own time to work on projects. Which i do believe the idea of traditional photo-essays had become less popular today in the 21st century. As a result of new ways photographer discovered to tell a story, using medium such as Muti-media piece, Mockumentary or simply something that are non-related to “The Decisive Moment”, pushing the boundary of images that may be sit well on a white wall as much as the front page of Newspapers. 

Alec Soth once said, “Photography is very related to poetry. It’s suggestive and fragmentary and unsatisfying in a lot of ways. It’s as much about what you leave out as what you put in.”


Looking at Alec Soth’s latest photo-essay exploring worker’s live in North Dakota during the Oil boom, was a perfect example of photojournalism in a distinctive way. Without having to capture a emotional portrait of a person suffering, he is capable of depict a sad subject matter via set up portraits with direct flash along with deadpan landscapes. Therefore whether you follow the traditional way to make photograph or you embrace your aesthetic mindset to tell a story, is an original message in the end that will makes documentary photographs appealing. 

Will Robson Scott 
http://www.willrobsonscott.co.uk/

Alec Soth – The luckiest place on earth 
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/02/03/magazine/north-dakota-photos-audio.html?ref=magazine&_r=0#/?slide=6

Apr 16th, 2013 7:55am

By Sam Wong

Nick!

Is an interesting way you brought out different perspectives of photojournalism. I believe whether is hard news or fine art documentary, what makes a strong establishing photo-essay, is either create a question that draw people’s attention to the issue or simply having a clear message. Furthermore is how the photographer feels comfortable portraying a situation in his/her style and manner. During the weekend, a conversation with an UK base documentary photographer Will Robson Scott, known for his series “Crack & Shine Int’l”. His idea of making a good body of work is to get a day job, while using excessive amount of your own time to work on projects. Which i do believe the idea of traditional photo-essays had become less popular today in the 21st century. As a result of new ways photographer discovered to tell a story, using medium such as Muti-media piece, Mockumentary or simply something that are non-related to “The Decisive Moment”, pushing the boundary of images that may be sit well on a white wall as much as the front page of Newspapers.

Alec Soth once said, “Photography is very related to poetry. It’s suggestive and fragmentary and unsatisfying in a lot of ways. It’s as much about what you leave out as what you put in.”


Looking at Alec Soth’s latest photo-essay exploring worker’s live in North Dakota during the Oil boom, was a perfect example of photojournalism in a distinctive way. Without having to capture a emotional portrait of a person suffering, he is capable of depict a sad subject matter via set up portraits with direct flash along with deadpan landscapes. Therefore whether you follow the traditional way to make photograph or you embrace your aesthetic mindset to tell a story, is an original message in the end that will makes documentary photographs appealing.

Will Robson Scott
http://www.willrobsonscott.co.uk/

Alec Soth – The luckiest place on earth
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/02/03/magazine/north-dakota-photos-audio.html?ref=magazine&_r=0#/?slide=6

Apr 16th, 2013 7:55am

By Sam Wong

Tags: #alecsoth